Year 3 Curriuculum

Welcome to our Year 3 Curriculum Page.

On this page you will find:

  • information about what our children are learning
  • expected standards at the end of the year  in Reading, Writing and Mathematics
  • information about any formal assessments

If you would like to see what is happening in our class, please look at our Blog or follow Twitter .

Please click image to enlarge

Please click image to enlarge

What children should know at the end of Year 3

Expectations in Maths

Counting & ordering Compare & order numbers up to 1000.
Numbers &

more/less

Read & write all numbers to 1000 in digits & words.

Find 10 or 100 more/less than a given number.

Tables & multiples Count from 0 in multiples of 4, 8, 50 & 100.

Recall & use multiplication & division facts for 3, 4, 8 tables.

Place value & rounding Recognise PV of any 3-digit number.
Calculations

+/-

 

Add & subtract 3-digit numbers including using column method

Use inverse to check.

Calculations x/÷ Multiply  2-digit by 1-digit
Fractions & percentages

 

Count up/down in tenths.

Compare & order fractions with same denominator.

+/- fractions with same denominator with whole.

Know pairs of fractions that total 1.

Time

 

Tell time using 12 and 24 hour clocks; and using roman numerals.

Tell time to nearest minute.

Know number of days in each month.

Expectations in Reading

Comprehension and Understanding Comments on the way characters relate to one another.

Knows which words are essential in a sentence to retain meaning.

Prediction, inference & deduction Draw inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts & motives from their actions.

 

Intonation and Expression Recognise how commas are used to give more meaning.

 

Grammatical Features

 

Recognise:

– plurals

– pronouns and how used

– collective nouns

– adverbs

Can explain the difference that adjectives and verbs make.

Expectations in Writing

Sentence & text structure

 

Use conjunctions (when, so, before, after, while, because).

Use adverbs (e.g. then, next, soon).

Use prepositions (e.g. before, after, during, in, because of).

Experiment with adjectives to create impact.

Correctly use verbs in 1st, 2nd & 3rd person.

Use perfect form of verbs to mark relationships of time & cause.

Punctuation Correct use of speech marks for direct speech.
Paragraphing

 

Group ideas into paragraphs around a theme.

Write under headings & sub-headings.

Handwriting

 

Legible, joined handwriting.

Humanities

History To know:

What was new about the New Stone Age?

How unpleasant were the Bronze and Iron Ages?

How much did the Ancient Egyptians achieve?

What happened when the Romans came? What was important to our local Victorians?

Is it better to be a child now than in the past?

Geography To know:

Where on Earth are we?

Is climate cool?

Do you like to be beside the seaside?

Can you come on a great American road trip?

How does water go round and round?

Can the Earth shake, rattle and roll?

 

Expectations in Science

Movement and Feeding Identify that animals, including humans, need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat

Identify that humans and some other animals have skeletons and muscles for support, protection and movement.

Gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions

Asking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer them

Setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests

Making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers

Using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions

Using straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings.

Light and Shadows Recognise that they need light in order to see things and that dark is the absence of light

Notice that light is reflected from surfaces

Recognise that shadows are formed when the light from a light source is blocked by a solid object

Recognise that light from the sun can be dangerous and that there are ways to protect their eyes

Find patterns in the way that the size of shadows change.

Setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests

Gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions

Reporting on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions

Making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers

Using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions

What Plants Need Explore the requirements of plants for life and growth (air, light, water, nutrients from soil, and room to grow) and how they vary from plant to plant

Gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions

Recording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables

Making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers

Using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions

Identifying differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes

Setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests

Using straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings.

Reporting on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions

Rocks and Soils Compare and group together different kinds of rocks on the basis of their appearance and simple physical properties

Describe in simple terms how fossils are formed when things that have lived are trapped within rock

Recognise that soils are made from rocks and organic matter.

Making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers

Setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests

Parts of Plants Identify and describe the functions of different parts of flowering plants: roots, stem/trunk, leaves and flowers

Investigate the way in which water is transported within plants

Explore the part that flowers play in the life cycle of flowering plants, including pollination, seed formation and seed dispersal.

Asking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer them

Making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers

Gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions

Using straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings.

Magnets and Forces Compare how things move on different surfaces

Notice that some forces need contact between two objects, but magnetic forces can act at a distance

Describe magnets as having two poles

Predict whether two magnets will attract or repel each other, depending on which poles are facing.

Observe how magnets attract or repel each other and attract some materials and not others

Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of whether they are attracted to a magnet, and identify some magnetic materials

Making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers

Gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions

Setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests

Using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions

Using straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings.

Identifying differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes

Asking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer them